Chad Pennington

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Chad Pennington : biography

June 26, 1976 –

Playoffs

Year Team G GS Passing Rushing
Att Comp Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
2002 NYJ 2 2 72 40 55.6 405 5.6 4 2 78.8 3 6 2.0 0
2004 NYJ 2 2 66 44 66.7 461 7.0 2 1 90.5 5 3 0.6 0
2006 NYJ 1 1 40 23 57.5 300 7.5 1 1 79.2 2 1 0.5 0
2008 MIA 1 1 38 25 65.8 252 6.6 1 4 53.7 1 0 0 0
Total 6 6 216 132 61.1 1,418 6.6 8 8 77.3 11 10 0.9 0

Personal

Pennington married his college girlfriend, Robin Hampton, on March 1, 2001. He famously brought his Jets playbook on his honeymoon. The couple have three sons together. Pennington and his family currently reside in Woodford County, Kentucky.http://articles.centralkynews.com/2013-01-14/amnews/36338536_1_mark-stoops-uk-football-national-guard-border-bowl

1st and 10 Foundation

Chad and Robin Pennington created the 1st and 10 Foundation in 2003 with the mission to build stronger communities by funding programs and institutions that seek to improve quality of life throughout West Virginia, Tennessee and the New York Metropolitan area. Since its inception in 2003 the foundation has given gifts of over half a million dollars to various organizations.

Stock Contractor

Pennington created #10 Bucking Bulls with partner JW Hart. He has hauled bulls to the PBR Finals several times, with the most famous being #121, Cat Man Do.

Early years

Pennington’s father, Elwood, was a physical education teacher and football coach at Halls High School, and his mother, Denise, a teacher at the Webb School of Knoxville. Pennington’s first sport was basketball, which he began playing in the third grade. Both of Pennington’s parents are of English descent. He began playing football in his freshman year in high school. His parents decided to have him repeat the eighth grade when he was enrolled at the Webb School of Knoxville due to the school’s intense academic program. Pennington played baseball, basketball and football at Webb but knew he had a better chance at getting into college via football.

He was only recruited by two colleges, Middle Tennessee State University and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, both Division 1-AA schools. In 1995, he went to a training camp at Marshall University, his parents’ alma mater, where he was noticed by head football coach Jim Donnan and offered a scholarship.

College career

Originally the Thundering Herd’s fourth-string quarterback in 1995 (and slated to be redshirted), Pennington led Marshall to the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship game, in which Marshall lost to Montana, 22-20. The following year, Pennington was redshirted in favor of Eric Kresser, a transfer from the University of Florida who guided the Herd’s return to the 1-AA Championship game in 1996. Pennington returned to play in 1997 as Marshall moved from Division 1-AA to Division 1-A football. His senior year (1999) featured Marshall having an undefeated and untied record (13-0) as Pennington led the team to its third consecutive Mid-American Conference championship.

Pennington set school records in several passing categories. Randy Moss was Pennington’s top receiver at Marshall. He finished fifth in Heisman voting in 1999. Pennington was selected by the New York Jets in the first round and was the eighteenth (18th) overall pick of the 2000 NFL Draft. Pennington finished his career at Marshall with 1,026 of 1,619 completions for 13,423 yards and 115 touchdowns, with only 45 interceptions.

He led Marshall to the school’s first bowl victory in a 48-29 routing of Louisville in the 1998 Motor City Bowl. Pennington was the bowl game’s MVP. Pennington and Marshall returned to Pontiac, Michigan, the following year taking a 21-3 victory over Brigham Young, capping Pennington’s undefeated senior season.

In addition to his success on the football field, Pennington excelled academically, graduating with a degree in journalism, a 3.83 grade point average and becoming a finalist for the Rhodes Scholarship. He wrote frequently for Marshall’s newspaper The Parthenon and was a broadcaster for the school’s radio station, although he used a pseudonym on air so as not to be distracting.