Roger Clemens

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Roger Clemens : biography

August 4, 1962 –

After the NLCS victory, Clemens lasted only two innings in Game 1 of the 2005 World Series. The Astros went on to lose all four games of the franchise’s first World Series to the Chicago White Sox. A hamstring pull had hampered Clemens’ performance since at least September.

The Astros declined arbitration to Clemens on December 7, , which prevented them from re-signing him before May 1, . The Astros, Rangers, Red Sox, and Yankees expressed an interest in signing him, but Clemens implied that he was finally retiring after his Team USA was eliminated by Mexico in the second round from the 2006 World Baseball Classic on March 16, 2006. However, there was no formal retirement announcement.

On May 31, 2006, following another extended period of speculation, it was announced that Clemens was coming out of retirement for the third time to pitch for the Astros for the remainder of the 2006 season. Clemens signed a contract worth $22,000,022 (his uniform number is #22), which would have been the highest one-year deal in MLB history. But since Clemens did not play a full season, he received a prorated percentage of that: approximately $12.25 million. Clemens made his return on June 22, 2006, against the Minnesota Twins, losing to their rookie phenom, Francisco Liriano, 4–2. For the second year in a row, his win total did not match his performance, as he finished the season with a 7–6 record, a 2.30 ERA, and a 1.04 WHIP. However, Clemens averaged just under 6 innings in his starts and never pitched into the eighth.

Second stint with the New York Yankees (2007)

Following what was becoming familiar annual speculation, Clemens unexpectedly appeared in the owner’s box at Yankee Stadium on May 6, , during the seventh-inning stretch in a game against the Seattle Mariners, and made a brief statement: "Thank y’all. Well they came and got me out of Texas, and uhh, I can tell you its a privilege to be back. I’ll be talkin’ to y’all soon." It was simultaneously announced that Clemens had rejoined the Yankees roster,Associated Press, , NYTimes.com, May 6, 2007. agreeing to a pro-rated one-year deal worth $28,000,022, or about $4.7 million per month. Over the contract life, he would make $18.7 million. This equated to just over $1 million per start that season.

Clemens made his 2007 return on June 9, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates with six innings of 3-run, 5-hit, 2-walk, 7-strikeout pitching. On June 21, with a single in the 5th inning against the Colorado Rockies, Clemens became the oldest New York Yankee to record a hit (44 years, 321 days). On June 24, Clemens pitched an inning in relief against the San Francisco Giants. It had been 22 years and 341 days since his previous regular-season relief appearance, the longest such gap in major league history.

On July 2, Clemens collected his 350th win against the Minnesota Twins at Yankee Stadium, giving up just two hits and one run over eight innings. Clemens is one of only three pitchers to pitch his entire career in the live-ball era and reach 350 wins. The other two are Warren Spahn (whose catcher for his 350th win was Joe Torre, Clemens’ manager for his 350th), and Greg Maddux, who earned his 350th win in 2008.

After reaggravating a hamstring injury during Game 3 of the 2007 ALDS, Clemens was removed from the team’s starting rotation. He was replaced by right-hander Phil Hughes. With his last pitch, he struck out Victor Martinez of the Cleveland Indians. Clemens had finished the 2007 regular season with a record of 6–6 and a 4.18 ERA. His final regular season appearance was a start against the Red Sox at Fenway Park, in which he allowed 2 hits and 1 unearned run in 6 innings, and received a no-decision.

Early life

Clemens’s parents separated when he was an infant. His mother soon married Woody Booher, whom Clemens still considers his father. Booher died when Clemens was only nine years old, and Clemens has said that the only time he ever felt envious of other players is when he saw them in the clubhouse with their fathers. Clemens lived in Vandalia, Ohio until 1977, and then spent most of his high school years in Houston. At Spring Woods High School, Clemens played baseball for longtime head coach Charles Maiorana and also starred in football and basketball. He was scouted by the Philadelphia Phillies and Minnesota Twins during his senior year, but opted instead to go to college.