Robert Wilcox (actor)

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Robert Wilcox (actor) bigraphy, stories - Actor

Robert Wilcox (actor) : biography

10 May 1910 – 11 June 1955

Robert Wilcox (May 19, 1910 – June 11, 1955) was an American film actor of the 1930s and 1940s.

Acting career

He started his career with a Buffalo, NY Community Theater Group.Article by Hamilton B. Allen, Rochester Times Union newspaper, October 27, 1954; archived in the 1954-1955 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library His career began in earnest in 1936 after being signed by a Universal Pictures talent scout while playing Duke Mantee in a summer-stock production of The Petrified Forest. Wilcox worked in eighteen Hollywood movies before World War II, starting with the role of the Intern in Let Them Live.Article, Democrat and Chronicle newspaper, Rochester NY: "Footlights? Film? Actor must decide", January 1946; archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library (Another source states that he played the romantic lead in 26 films, before going into the service for World War II.) He was a contract player with Universal Studios, unhappy with his typecasting in "cops and robbers" roles. He is perhaps best known for playing Bob Wayne and his alter ego, "The Copperhead" in the 1940 movie serial Mysterious Doctor Satan.http://www.amazon.com/Mysterious-Doctor-Satan-Eduardo-Ciannelli/dp/6300208788

He was inducted into the United States Army February 27, 1942.New York Times, February 28, 1942 He served thirty-eight months in the United States Army during World War II, rising from private to the rank of captain, and seeing action in Belgium, France and Germany."Wilcox, Back from War, Takes Lead Role in Soldier’s Wife"; newspaper article January 1946, archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library Following the war, he returned to Rochester, and appeared in an amateur production of Soldier’s Wife, a quiet comedy by Rose Franklin about a veteran returning from the Pacific, presented in January 1946 by the Rochester Community Players. Wilcox, according to a contemporary news report, was considering whether go back to Hollywood or to work in professional theater. Only four of the twenty-five film credits on IMDb are dated after January 1946; his post-war work was mostly on the stage.

His last stage performance was in the road show Pajama Top, co-starring his wife, Diana Berrymore.New York Times obituary, June 12, 1955 The production, an English translation of the French comic success, Moumou, was directed Leonard Altobell (also a native of Rochester) and opened its national tour at the Auditorium Theater in Rochester November 8, 1954.

Death

Wilcox died of a heart attack on June 11, 1955, while riding a train from New York City to Rochester to visit his mother. A porter discovered his body in a Pullman berth when he tried to wake the actor at the Rochester train station stop. He was 45 years old. He is buried at Riverside Cemetery.

Personal life

He was born in Rochester NY, the son of Dr. Roscoe Squires Wilcox of Rochester, who died when Wilcox was 16.Letter to the Editor of the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle newspaper, January 1946; archived in the 1944-1946 Scrapbook of the Rochester Community Players collection, Local History Department, Rochester Public Library He attended Nazareth Hall Academy and John Marshall High School in Rochester.

He was married twice. His first wife was Florence Rice, daughter of sportswriter Grantland Rice, whom he married in 1937 and divorced two years later. He married Diana Barrymore in 1950. The five year marriage, which ended with his death, was stormy, with repeated separations, reconciliations and police calls for domestic disturbances. Obituary. Sarasota Herald Tribune June 13, 1955, pg. 12] Barrymore chronicled their bouts with alcoholism in her 1957 autobiography, Too Much, Too Soon, which she dedicated to him.