Pete Rose

54

Pete Rose : biography

April 14, 1941 –

According to the Dowd Report itself, "no evidence was discovered that Rose bet against the Reds", but in a December 2002 interview, investigator Dowd stated that he believed that Rose may have bet against the Reds while managing them. Those critical of Rose’s behavior, including Ohio’s own Hall of Fame baseball reporter Hal McCoy, have observed that "the major problem with Rose betting on baseball, particularly the Reds, is that as manager he could control games, make decisions that could enhance his chances of winning his bets, thus jeopardizing the integrity of the game.", as has happened when players in the Black Sox Scandal intentionally lost the 1919 World Series in a scheme with gamblers.http://encarta.msn.com/sidebar_461577611/should_pete_rose_be_in_the_hall_of_fame_.html The Major League baseball rule Rose violated makes no distinction between betting for or against your team, only that you bet on them and were in a position to influence the outcome. The rule is: "Rule 21 MISCONDUCT, (d) BETTING ON BALL GAMES, Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible."

Rose continued to deny all of the accusations against him and refused to appear at a hearing with Giamatti on the matter. He filed a lawsuit in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court alleging that the Commissioner had prejudged the case and could not provide a fair hearing. A Cincinnati judge issued a temporary restraining order to delay the hearing, but Giamatti fought to have the case moved to Federal Court. The Commissioner prevailed in that effort, after which he and Rose entered settlement negotiations.

On August 24, 1989, Rose voluntarily accepted a permanent place on baseball’s ineligible list. Rose accepted that there was a factual reason for the ban; in return, Major League Baseball agreed to make no formal finding with regard to the gambling allegations. According to baseball’s rules, Rose could apply for reinstatement in one year but Bart Giamatti said, "There is absolutely no deal for reinstatement. That is exactly what we did not agree to in terms of a fixed number of years." http://articles.latimes.com/1989-08-24/news/mn-1531_1_pete-rose Rose, with a 412–373 record, was replaced as Reds manager by Tommy Helms. Rose began therapy with a psychiatrist for treatment of a gambling addiction.

Rose’s ban has prevented the Reds from formally retiring his No. 14 jersey. However, aside from his son Pete Jr.’s brief stint with the team in 1997, the Reds have not issued that number since Rose’s ban. Uniform number 14 was retired in Rose’s honor by the Cincinnati Cyclones of the East Coast Hockey League.