Pete Rose

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Pete Rose bigraphy, stories - American baseball player, coach, manager

Pete Rose : biography

April 14, 1941 –

Peter Edward "Pete" Rose (born April 14, 1941), also known for his nickname "Charlie Hustle", is a former Major League Baseball player and manager. Rose played from 1963 to 1986, and managed from 1984 to 1989.

Rose, a switch hitter, is the all-time Major League leader in hits (4,256), games played (3,562), at-bats (14,053) and outs (10,328). He won three World Series rings, three batting titles, one Most Valuable Player Award, two Gold Gloves, the Rookie of the Year Award, and also made 17 All-Star appearances at an unequaled five different positions (2B, LF, RF, 3B & 1B). Claims were made that he pitched in a scrimmage game and threw close to 100 mph.

In August the year of 1989, three years after he retired as an active player, Rose agreed to permanent ineligibility from baseball amidst accusations that he gambled on baseball games while playing for and managing the Reds, including claims that he bet on his own team. In 1991, the Baseball Hall of Fame formally voted to ban those on the "permanently ineligible" list from induction, after previously excluding such players by informal agreement among voters. In 2004, after years of public denial, Rose admitted to betting on baseball and on, but not against, the Reds. The issue of Rose’s possible re-instatement and election to the Hall of Fame remains a contentious one throughout baseball.

Retirement from playing

On November 11, Rose was dropped from the Reds’ 40-man roster to make room for pitcher Pat Pacillo, and he unofficially retired as a player. "Charlie Hustle" finished with an incredible number of Major League and National League records that have lasted for many years. Rose, always proud of his ability to hit .300 or better in 15 of his 24 playing seasons, had a lifetime .303 batting average.

Rose managed the Reds from August 15, 1984 to August 24, 1989, with a 426–388 record. During his four full seasons at the helm (1985–1988), the Reds posted four second-place finishes in the NL West division. His 426 managerial wins rank fifth in Reds history.

30-day suspension

On April 30, 1988, during a home game against the New York Mets, with two out in the top of the ninth inning umpire Dave Pallone made a safe at first call that allowed what would become the eventual game-winning run to score. Rose argued the call vehemently and made physical contact with the umpire, forcefully pushing him. Rose told reporters after the game that he shoved Pallone only after the umpire made contact with him; he said a scratch near his left eye proved Pallone touched him first. In his 1990 book, Pallone claimed that scratch was self-inflicted in the clubhouse after the ejection.Behind The Mask: My Double Life in Baseball http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,317951,00.html National League president A. Bartlett Giamatti suspended Rose for 30 days, which was the longest suspension ever levied for an on-field incident involving a manager. Giamatti said, "For forcefully and deliberately shoving an umpire, the manager of the Reds, Mr. Pete Rose, is suspended for 30 days and fined a substantial amount." Cincinnati fans showered the field with various objects including radios and cigarette lighters. After a 15-minute suspension of play umpire Pallone left the field and the game was completed with the remaining three umpires. Giamatti also summoned the on-air announcers at the game and said "Inciting the unacceptable behavior of some of the fans were the inflammatory and completely irresponsible remarks of local radio broadcasters Marty Brennaman and Joe Nuxhall. . . . There is no excuse for encouraging a situation where the physical safety and well-being of any individual is put significantly at risk. Nothing justifies such unprofessional behavior."

Playing career

Cincinnati Reds (1963–1978)

Rookie of the Year

During a spring training game against the Chicago White Sox in 1963, the Reds’ regular second baseman, Don Blasingame, pulled a groin muscle; Rose got his chance and made the most of it. During another spring training game against the New York Yankees, Whitey Ford gave him the derisive nickname "Charlie Hustle" after Rose sprinted to first base after drawing a walk. Despite (or perhaps because of) the manner in which Ford intended it, Rose adopted that nickname as a badge of honor. In Ken Burns’ documentary Baseball, Mickey Mantle claimed that Ford gave Rose the nickname after Rose, playing in left field, made an effort to climb the fence to try to catch a Mantle home run that everyone could see was headed over everything.