Rush Limbaugh

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Rush Limbaugh : biography

January 12, 1951 –

Environmental issues

Limbaugh is critical of environmentalism and climate science. He has disputed claims of anthropogenic global warming, and the relationship between CFCs and depletion of the ozone layer, saying the scientific evidence does not support them.On the Issues.org. . Limbaugh has argued against the scientific consensus on climate change saying it is "just a bunch of scientists organized around a political proposition."RushLimbaugh.com. Limbaugh has used the term "environmentalist wacko" when referring to left-leaning environmental advocates.See, for instance, As a rhetorical device, he has also used the term to refer to more mainstream climate scientists and other environmental scientists and advocates with whom he disagrees.

Limbaugh has written that "there are more acres of forestland in America today than when Columbus discovered the continent in 1492," a claim that is disputed by the United States Forest Service and the American Forestry Association, which state that the precolonial forests have been reduced by about 24% or nearly 300 million acres.

Feminism

Limbaugh is critical of feminism, saying that "Feminism was established so as to allow unattractive women easier access to the mainstream of society." He also popularized the term "feminazi", referring to about two dozen feminists "to whom the most important thing in life is ensuring that as many abortions as possible occur."Rush H. Limbaugh, The Way Things Ought to Be, Pocket Books, 1992 He credited his friend Tom Hazlett, a professor of law and economics at George Mason University, with coining the term.Rush H. Limbaugh, The Way Things Ought to Be, Pocket Books, 1992

"I prefer to call the most obnoxious feminists what they really are: feminazis. Tom Hazlett, a good friend who is an esteemed and highly regarded professor of economics at the University of California at Davis, coined the term to describe any female who is intolerant of any point of view that challenges militant feminism. I often use it to describe women who are obsessed with perpetuating a modern-day holocaust: abortion."

Iraq prisoner abuse

On the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse scandal, Limbaugh said, "This is no different than what happens at the Skull and Bones initiation … And we’re going to ruin people’s lives over it and we’re going to hamper our military effort, and then we are going to really hammer them because they had a good time."

Obama’s policies

On January 16, 2009, Limbaugh commented on the Obama presidency, "I hope he fails." Limbaugh later said that he wants to see Obama’s policies fail, not the man himself. Speaking of Obama, Limbaugh said, "He’s my president, he’s a human being, and his ideas and policies are what count for me."

Professional career

1970s

After dropping out of college, Limbaugh moved to McKeesport, Pennsylvania. In 1972, he became a Top 40 music disc jockey on WIXZ, a small AM radio station that reached much of the Pittsburgh area. He started with an afternoon show and later did mornings, broadcasting under the name Jeff Christie. Limbaugh moved to Pittsburgh station KQV in 1973 as the evening disc jockey, succeeding Jim Quinn. He was fired in late-1974, when the station was sold to Taft Broadcasting. Limbaugh was reportedly told by management that he would never make it as on air talent, and should consider going into sales. Unable to find another job in local radio, Limbaugh moved back home to Cape Girardeau. He became a lifelong fan of the Pittsburgh Steelers from his time in the region.http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/daily/site_052209/content/01125104.guest.htmlhttp://www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/03/01/transcript-rush-limbaughs-address-cpac/http://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/fanatics-brave-cold-for-titanic-super-bowl-contest-between-steelers-and-packers/story-e6frg7mf-1226000987695

For the rest of the decade Limbaugh took jobs at several radio stations, working in music radio, before settling in Kansas City. In 1979, he left radio and accepted a position as director of promotions with the Kansas City Royals baseball team. There he developed a close friendship with then-Royals star third baseman and future Hall of Famer George Brett; the two remain close friends.