Oda Nobunaga

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Oda Nobunaga : biography

June 23, 1534 – June 21, 1582

Other relatives

One of Nobunaga’s younger sisters, Oichi, gave birth to three daughters. These three nieces of Nobunaga became involved with important historical figures. Chacha (also known as Lady Yodo), the eldest, became the mistress of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. O-Hatsu married Kyōgoku Takatsugu. The youngest, O-go, married the son of Tokugawa Ieyasu, Tokugawa Hidetada (the second shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate). O-go’s daughter Senhime married her cousin Toyotomi Hideyori, Lady Yodo’s son.

Nobunaga’s nephew was Tsuda Nobusumi, the son of Nobuyuki. Nobusumi married Akechi Mitsuhide’s daughter, and was killed after the Incident at Honnō-ji by Nobunaga’s third son, Nobutaka, who suspected him of being involved in the plot.

Later descendants

Nobunari Oda, a competitive figure skater in Japan, is the 17th direct descendant of Nobunaga.. International Skating Union. Retrieved August 19, 2007.. Nobunari Oda. Retrieved September 15, 2007. The Japanese ex-monk celebrity Mudō Oda also claims descent from the Sengoku period warlord, but his claims have not been verified. Further descendants were traced in countries where descendants from the 1900s’ wars were deployed and families migrated, namely Hong Kong, South Korea, The Philippines, US, Canada and New Zealand.

Biography

Oda Nobunaga was born on June 23, 1534, and was given the childhood name of . He was the second son of Oda Nobuhide. Through his childhood and early teenage years, he was well known for his bizarre behavior and received the name of . With the introduction of firearms into Japan, though, he became known for his fondness of Tanegashima firearms. He was also known to run around with other youths from the area, without any regard to his own rank in society. He is said to be born in Nagoya Castle, although this is subject to debate. It is however certain that he was born in the Owari domain. In 1574 Nobunaga accepted the title of Kuge (or Court Noble), then in 1577 he was given the title of Udaijin (or Minister of the Right), the third highest position in the Imperial court.

Unification of Owari Province

Portrait of Oda Nobunaga, by [[Jesuit painter Giovanni Niccolo, 1583-1590.]] In 1551, Oda Nobuhide died unexpectedly and, during his funeral, Nobunaga was said to have acted outrageously, throwing the ceremonial incense at the altar. Tale 3 – His Extraordinary Appearance This act alienated many Oda retainers, convincing them of Nobunaga’s mediocrity and lack of discipline and they began to side with his more soft-spoken and well-mannered brother, Nobuyuki. Hirate Masahide, who was a valuable mentor and retainer to Nobunaga, was ashamed by Nobunaga’s behavior and performed seppuku. This had a huge effect on Nobunaga, who later built a temple to honor Masahide.

Though Nobunaga was Nobuhide’s legitimate successor, the Oda clan was divided into many factions. Furthermore, the entire clan was technically under the control of Owari’s shugo, Shiba Yoshimune. Thus Oda Nobutomo, as the brother to the deceased Nobuhide and deputy to the shugo, used the powerless Yoshimune as his puppet and challenged Nobunaga’s place as Owari’s new ruler. Nobutomo murdered Yoshimune when it was discovered that he supported and attempted to aid Nobunaga.

To increase his power, Nobunaga persuaded Oda Nobumitsu, a younger brother of Nobuhide, to join his side and, with Nobumitsu’s help, slew Nobutomo in Kiyosu Castle, which later became Nobunaga’s place of residence for over ten years. Taking advantage of the position of Shiba Yoshikane, Yoshimune’s son, as the rightful shugo, Nobunaga forged an alliance with the Imagawa clan of Suruga Province and the Kira clan of Mikawa Province, as both clans had the same shugo and would have no excuse to decline. Additionally, this also ensured that the Imagawa clan would have to stop attacking Owari’s borders.

Even though Nobuyuki and his supporters were still at large, Nobunaga decided to bring an army to Mino Province to aid Saitō Dōsan after Dōsan’s son, Saitō Yoshitatsu, turned against him. The campaign failed, however, as Dōsan was killed and Yoshitatsu became the new master of Mino in 1556.