Mike Tyson

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Mike Tyson : biography

June 30, 1966 –

Tyson, who was the number one contender, faced number two contender Donovan "Razor" Ruddock on March 18, 1991, in Las Vegas. Ruddock was seen as the most dangerous heavyweight around and was thought of as one of the hardest punching heavyweights. Tyson and Ruddock went back and forth for most of the fight, until referee Richard Steele controversially stopped the fight during the seventh round in favor of Tyson. This decision infuriated the fans in attendance, sparking a post-fight melee in the audience. The referee had to be escorted from the ring.Bellfield, Lee., , Saddoboxing.com, March 13, 2005. Retrieved March 15, 2007.

Tyson and Ruddock met again on June 28 that year, with Tyson knocking down Ruddock twice and winning a 12 round unanimous decision.Berger, Phil (1991), "Tyson Floors Ruddock Twice and Wins Rematch", The New York Times, Sports Desk, Late Edition-Final, Section 1, Page 29, Column 5, June 29, 1991. A fight between Tyson and Holyfield for the undisputed championship was arranged for the autumn of 1991. The match between Tyson and reigning champion Holyfield was scheduled for November 8, 1991 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, but Tyson pulled out after sustaining a rib cartilage injury during training.

Comeback

After being paroled from prison, Tyson easily won his comeback bouts against Peter McNeeley and Buster Mathis Jr.. Tyson’s first comeback fight grossed more than US$96 million worldwide, including a United States record $63 million for PPV television. The fight was purchased by 1.52 million homes, setting both PPV viewership and revenue records., AP via New York Times, 2005-09-01. Retrieved March 31, 2007. The 89-second fight elicited criticism that Tyson’s management lined up "tomato cans" to ensure easy victories for his return.Sandomir, Richard (1995), "TV SPORTS; Who Must Tyson Face Next? A Finer Brand of Tomato Can", The New York Times, Sports Desk, Late Edition – Final, Section B, Page 8, Column 1, August 22, 1995. TV Guide included the Tyson-McNeeley fight in their list of the 50 Greatest TV Sports Moments of All Time in 1998."50 Greatest TV Sports Moments of All Time", TV Guide, July 11, 1998

Tyson regained one belt by easily winning the WBC title from Frank Bruno in March 1996. It was the second fight between the two, and Tyson knocked Bruno out in the third round.Bellfield, Lee., , Saddoboxing.com, 2005-03-18. Retrieved March 26, 2007. Tyson added the WBA belt by defeating champion Bruce Seldon in one round in September that year. Seldon was severely criticized and mocked in the popular press for seemingly collapsing to innocuous punches from Tyson.Gordon, Randy., , Cyberboxingzone.com, 1996-09-04. Retrieved March 26, 2007.

Legacy

A 1998 ranking of "The Greatest Heavyweights of All-Time" by Ring magazine placed Tyson at No.14 on the list. Despite criticism of facing underwhelming competition during his unbeaten run as champion, Tyson’s knockout power and intimidation factor made him the sport’s most dynamic box office attraction. Many believe Tyson was the last great heavyweight champion.

In Ring Magazine’s list of the 80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years, released in 2002, Tyson was ranked at No. 72. He is ranked No. 16 on Ring Magazine’s 2003 list of 100 greatest punchers of all time.

On June 12, 2011, Tyson was inducted to the International Boxing Hall of Fame alongside legendary Mexican champion Julio César Chávez, light welterweight champion Kostya Tszyu, and actor/screenwriter Sylvester Stallone.. Ibhof.com (December 7, 2010). Retrieved on 2011-11-25.

Early years

Tyson was born in Brooklyn, New York City. He has a brother, Rodney, who is five years older than him. His sister, Denise, died of a heart attack at age 25 in 1991.

Tyson’s father, Jimmy Kirkpatrick, was from Grier Town, North Carolina (near Charlotte), where he was one of the neighborhood’s top baseball players. Kirkpatrick married and had a son, Tyson’s half-brother Jimmie Lee Kirkpatrick, who would help to integrate Charlotte high school football in 1965. In 1959, Jimmy Kirkpatrick left his family and moved to Brooklyn, where Tyson was born in 1966. Kirkpatrick frequented pool halls, gambled and hung out on the streets. “My father was just a regular street guy caught up in the street world,” Tyson said. Kirkpatrick abandoned the Tyson family around the time Mike was born, leaving Tyson’s mother, Lorna Smith Tyson, to care for them on her own.Puma, Mike., , ESPN.com, 2005-10-10. Retrieved March 27, 2007 Kirkpatrick died in 1992.