Gautama Buddha

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Gautama Buddha : biography

c. 563 BCE – c. 483 BCE

Hajime Nakamura writes that there is nothing in the traditional Buddhist texts that can be clearly attributed to Gautama as a historical figure:Nakamura, Hajime. Indian Buddhism: A Survey with Bibliographical Notes. 1999. p. 57

Some of the fundamentals of the teachings attributed to Gautama Buddha are:

  • The Four Noble Truths: that suffering is an ingrained part of existence; that the origin of suffering is craving for sensuality, acquisition of identity, and annihilation; that suffering can be ended; and that following the Noble Eightfold Path is the means to accomplish this;
  • The Noble Eightfold Path: right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration;
  • Dependent origination: the mind creates suffering as a natural product of a complex process;
  • Rejection of the infallibility of accepted scripture: Teachings should not be accepted unless they are borne out by our experience and are praised by the wise. See the Kalama Sutta for details;
  • Anicca (Sanskrit: anitya): That all things that come to be have an end;
  • Dukkha (Sanskrit: ‘): That nothing which comes to be is ultimately satisfying;
  • Anattā (Sanskrit: anātman): That nothing in the realm of experience can really be said to be "I" or "mine";
  • Nibbāna (Sanskrit: Nirvāna): It is possible for sentient beings to realize a dimension of awareness which is totally unconstructed and peaceful, and end all suffering due to the mind’s interaction with the conditioned world.

However, in some Mahayana schools, these points have come to be regarded as more or less subsidiary. There is disagreement amongst various schools of Buddhism over more complex aspects of what the Buddha is believed to have taught, and also over some of the disciplinary rules for monks.

According to tradition, the Buddha emphasized ethics and correct understanding. He questioned everyday notions of divinity and salvation. He stated that there is no intermediary between mankind and the divine; distant gods are subjected to karma themselves in decaying heavens; and the Buddha is only a guide and teacher for beings who must tread the path of Nirvana (Pāli: Nibbāna) themselves to attain the spiritual awakening called bodhi and understand reality. The Buddhist system of insight and meditation practice is not claimed to have been divinely revealed, but to spring from an understanding of the true nature of the mind, which must be discovered by treading the path guided by the Buddha’s teachings.

Biography

Conception and birth

Most scholars regard Kapilavastu, present-day Nepal, to be the birthplace of the Buddha.{} Other possibilities are Lumbini, present-day Nepal {} Kapileswara, Odisha, present-day India; {} and Piprahwa, Uttar Pradesh, present-day India.{}