Donna Haraway

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Donna Haraway : biography

September 6, 1944 –

Another review of the same book, appearing in a 1990 issue of the American Journal of Primatology, offers a similar criticism of Haraway’s literary style and scholarly methods:Cachel, Susan. "Partisan primatology. Review of Primate Visions: Gender, Race, and Nature in the World of Modern Science." American Journal of Primatology. 22:2 (1990) 139-142.

There are many places where an editorial hand appears absent altogether. Neologisms are continually coined, and sentences are paragraph-long and convoluted. Biography, history, propaganda, science, science fiction, and cinema are intertwined in the most confusing way. Perhaps the idea is to induce a slightly dissociated state, so that readers can be lulled into belief. If one did not already possess some background, this book would give no lucid history of anthropology or primatology.

Early life

Donna Jeanne Haraway was born in 1944 in Denver, Colorado. Haraway’s father was a sportswriter for The Denver Post and her mother, who came from a heavily Irish Catholic background, died when she was 16 years old.Haraway, Donna J., How Like a Leaf: Donna J. Haraway an interview with Thyrza Nichols Goodeve. Routledge, 2000, p.6-7. Haraway attended high school at St. Mary’s Academy in Denver. After high school, Haraway moved to Paris and studied evolutionary philosophy and theology at the Fondation Teilhard de Chardin on a Fulbright scholarship.Haraway, Donna J., How Like a Leaf: Donna J. Haraway an interview with Thyrza Nichols Goodeve. Routledge, 2000, p.18. Haraway then triple majored in zoology, philosophy and literature at the Colorado College.Haraway, Donna J., How Like a Leaf: Donna J. Haraway an interview with Thyrza Nichols Goodeve. Routledge, 2000, p.12. She completed her Ph.D. in biology at Yale in 1970 writing a dissertation about the use of metaphor in shaping experiments in experimental biology titled Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields: Metaphors of Organicism in Twentieth-Century Developmental Biology.Haraway, Donna Jeanne, Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields: Metaphors of Organicism in Twentieth-Century Developmental Biology. Yale University Press, 1976. Haraway was the recipient of a number of scholarships, to which she wittingly accepted (alluding to the Cold War and post-war American hegemony) saying, “…people like me became national resources in the national science efforts. So, there was money available for educating even Irish Catholic girls’ brains."Bhavnani, Kum-Kum.; Haraway, Donna H. (February 1994), "Shifting the Subject: A Conversation between Kum-Kum Bhavnani and Donna Haraway, 12 April 1993, Santa Cruz, California", Feminism & Psychology (Thousand Oaks:Sage Publications)4(1):20

Publications

  • Crystals, Fabrics, and Fields: Metaphors of Organicism in Twentieth-Century Developmental Biology, 1976. ISBN 978-0-300-01864-6
  • "A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century", 1985.
  • "Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspectives", in Feminist Studies, pp. 575–599, 1988.
  • Primate Visions: Gender, Race, and Nature in the World of Modern Science, Routledge: New York and London, 1989. ISBN 978-0-415-90294-6
  • Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, New York: Routledge, and London: Free Association Books, 1991 (includes "A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist-Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century"). ISBN 978-0-415-90387-5
  • Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium.FemaleMan©Meets_OncoMouse™: Feminism and Technoscience, New York: Routledge, 1997 (winner of the Ludwig Fleck Prize). ISBN 0-415-91245-8
  • How Like a Leaf: A Conversation with Donna J. Haraway, Thyrza Nichols Goodeve, Routledge, 1999. ISBN 978-0-415-92402-3
  • The Companion Species Manifesto: Dogs, People, and Significant Otherness, Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press, 2003. ISBN 0-9717575-8-5
  • When Species Meet, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. ISBN 0-8166-5045-4