Saint Veronica bigraphy, stories - Christian saint

Saint Veronica : biography

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Saint Veronica, also called Saint Berenice, was a pious woman of Jerusalem in the first century AD, according to Catholic tradition. A celebrated saint in many pious Catholic countries, the Acta Sanctorum published by the Bollandists erroneously gave her Feast (under February 4), but the Jesuit Scholar Joseph Braun cited her commemoration in Festi Marianni on 13 January.

According to Catholic tradition, Veronica was moved with pity when she saw Jesus carrying his cross to Golgotha and gave him her veil that he might wipe his forehead. Jesus accepted the offering, held it to his face, and then handed it back to her—the image of his face miraculously impressed upon it. This piece of cloth became known as the Veil of Veronica.Notes and Queries, Volume 6 July–December 1852, London, page 252The Archaeological journal (UK), Volume 7, 1850 page 413Alban Butler, 2000 Lives of the Saints ISBN 0-86012-256-5 page 84

The name "Veronica" itself is a Latinisation of Berenice (), a Macedonian name, meaning "bearer of victory". Folk etymology has attributed its origin to the words for true () and image (). The Encyclopædia Britannica says this about the legend:

Eusebius in his Historia Ecclesiastica (vii 18) tells how at Caesarea Philippi lived the woman whom Christ healed of an issue of blood (Matt ix 20). Legend was not long in providing the woman of the Gospel with a name. In the West she was identified with Martha of Bethany; in the East she was called Berenike, or Beronike, the name appearing in as early a work as the "Acta Pilati", the most ancient form of which goes back to the fourth century. It is interesting to note that the fanciful derivation of the name Veronica from the words Vera Icon (eikon) "true image" dates back to the "Otia Imperialia" (iii 25) of Gervase of Tilbury (fl. 1211), who says: "Est ergo Veronica pictura Domini vera."

The Catholic Encyclopaedia of 1913 had this to say about the growth of the legend (translations in italics added): The belief in the existence of authentic images of Christ is connected with the old legend of King Abgar of Edessa and the apocryphal writing known as the "Mors Pilati" ("the Death of Pilate"). To distinguish at Rome the oldest and best known of these images it was called the vera icon (true image), which in the common tongue soon became "Veronica." It is thus designated in several medieval texts mentioned by the Bollandists (e.g. an old Missal of Augsburg has a Mass "De S. Veronica seu Vultus Domini") of ("Saint Veronica, or the Face of the Lord"), and Matthew of Westminster speaks of the imprint of the image of the Savior which is called Veronica: "Effigies Domenici vultus quae Veronica nuncupatur" ("effigy of the face of the Lord which is called a Veronica"). By degrees, popular imagination mistook this word for the name of a person and attached thereto several legends which vary according to the country.

The reference to Abgar is related to a similar legend in the Eastern Church, the Image of Edessa or Mandylion.

Veronica in popular culture

Mel Gibson's film The Passion of the Christ (2004) included an episode of Veronica wiping Jesus's face, although she is not referred to by name in the film (she is credited in the film as "Seraphia"). Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich, one of the inspirational sources to the cited movie, depicts a long and touching description of the St Veronica episode and she identifies the true name of St Veronica also as "Seraphia."

The most common pass with the cape in bullfighting is called a Veronica, as the torero holds the cape in the same way as St.Veronica is usually depicted holding the cloth.

Churches and parishes named in her honor

  • , Cincinnati, Ohio
  • , Chantilly, Virginia
  • , Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Living octopus

Living octopus

In countries which are located near sea coasts, sea food is an important part of national cuisine