Richardson Clover bigraphy, stories - United States admiral

Richardson Clover : biography

July 11, 1846 - October 14, 1919

Rear Admiral Richardson Clover (July 11, 1846 – October 14, 1919) was an officer of the United States Navy. An 1867 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, he was a noted hydrographer, served as Director of Naval Intelligence, and commanded the gunboat during the Spanish-American War. He was socially prominent in Washington, D.C. and served as US Naval Attaché to Great Britain. He commanded the on the Asiatic Station and served as President of the Board of Inspection and Survey. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1907 and retired in 1908.

Namesakes

Clover Bay and Clover Passage in the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, are named for him. Clover Deep, an undersea valley at 37N, 137 W off the coast of California, was named for him in 1895. The name changed to Glover Deep as the result of a typographical error and neither name is in current use. National Geospatial intelligence Agency

Notes

Gallery

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Biography

Clover was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, son of Lewis Peter Clover and Sarah Ann Ackerman Clover. His father was an artist who later became an Episcopal minister, serving congregations in Virginia, New Jersey, Illinois, and New York. Richardson Clover was appointed to the United States Naval Academy from Missouri in July 1863 and graduated in 1867. His first posting was to the frigate Susquehanna.John Howard Brown, Rossiter Johnson (1904) The twentieth century biographical dictionary of notable Americans... unpaged. The Biographical SocietyJohn Howard Brown, Rossiter Johnson (1904) The twentieth century biographical dictionary of notable Americans... unpaged. The Biographical Society, 1904Lewis Randolph Hamersly (1894) The records of living officers of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, p 160. L.R. Hamersly Co.

Clover had a varied career in the service including several hydrographic assignments. He served on the Coast Survey steamer on the Pacific coast 1874-77, and had a brief assignment to the Naval Hydrographic Office. He was again assigned to the Coast Survey in 1881, first in the Washington office and then commanding the schooner Palinurus surveying Long Island Sound. He supervised construction of the steamer and became her first commander. Under Clover, the Patterson sailed to California by way of the Straits of Magellan and subsequently made surveys in southeastern Alaska in 1885, covering the north shore of Dixon Entrance (except for Cordova Bay), and Clarence Strait as far north as Union Bay. He remained in charge of the Patterson and the Southeast Alaska survey until he was relieved by A.S Snow in March 1886.Lewis Randolph Hamersly (1902) The records of living officers of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, p143. L.R. Hamersly Co.New York Times January 16, 1884, Page 8. NOAABaker, Marcus (1906) United States Geological Survey Bulletin 299United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1887 p 141

Following a year's leave accompanying his marriage, Clover was posted to the torpedo station at Newport and then attended the Naval War College from September 1887 until January 1888. Subsequently he was posted as Navigator on the , then as Executive officer on the from December 1888 to December 1889. During this period Dolphin completed her round-the-world cruise.

He returned to the Naval Hydrographic Office in 1889. He became Acting Hydrographer in September 1890 and was formally appointed Hydrographer (i.e. head of the office) in May 1891, accompanying his appointment as Lieutenant Commander. He was appointed one of the initial members, and secretary, of the Board on Geographic Names in 1890. He continued as Hydrographer until 1893.New York Times June 4, 1891 "LIEUT. CLOVER'S PROMOTION"Smithsonian Institution, William Jones Rhees The Smithsonian Institution: documents relative to its origin and ..., V 2* New York Times January 4, 1891, P 20 "HOW UNCLE SAM WILL SPELL"

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Living octopus

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