Nathaniel Macon bigraphy, stories - Speaker of the House

Nathaniel Macon : biography

December 17, 1757 - June 29, 1837

Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1757June 29, 1837) was a spokesman for the Old Republican faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to strictly limit the United States federal government. Macon was born near Warrenton, North Carolina, and attended the College of New Jersey and served briefly in the American Revolutionary War. He was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1791 to 1815; from 1801 to 1807 he was Speaker of the House. He served in the Senate from December, 1815, until his resignation in 1828. He was president of the North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1835.

Marriage and family

Nathaniel met Hannah Plummer in 1782 in Warrenton, North Carolina. Her parents were Virginians, as were Nathaniel's, and they were "well connected". Nathaniel was a tall man, over , and considered attractive, but he was not the only man who was pursuing Miss Plummer. However, after a number of months of courtship, Hannah and Nathaniel decided to marry.

Their wedding took place on October 9, 1783, and their marriage was an affectionate one. They made their home on Hubquarter Creek on their plantation known as "Buck Spring". It was about north of Warrenton, near Roanoke, on land which Nathaniel had inherited from his father.

According to Bible records, the Macons had three children:

  • Betsy Kemp Macon (September 12, 1784 – November 10, 1829) married William John Martin (March 6, 1781 – December 11, 1828)
  • Plummer Macon (April 14, 1786 – July 26, 1792)
  • Seignora Macon (November 15, 1787 – ?)

Nathaniel's wife, Hannah, died on July 11, 1790 when she was just 29 years old. Although Nathaniel was only 32 at the time of her death, he never remarried. It is said that he was devoted to his wife, and his long unmarried life following her early death would suggest that he was faithful to her memory. Her remains were buried not far from their home on the borders of their yard. Their only son died just over a year after Hannah and was buried beside her. When Nathaniel died July 29, 1837 at age 78, he was laid to rest next to his wife and son. As he requested, the site of their graves was covered with a great heap of flint stones so that the land would be left uncultivated because Nathaniel believed that no one would want to go to the trouble of removing all of the flint in order to use the land, thereby preserving the burial site.

Nathaniel Macon is the great-grandfather of Congressman Charles Martin, the uncle of Willis Alston and Micajah Thomas Hawkins, great-uncle of Matt Whitaker Ransom, Robert Ransom and Thomas Jefferson Green, great-great-uncle of Wharton Jackson Green, John Pegram, William Ransom Johnson Pegram, and David Harrison Macon, great-great-great-great-uncle of Claude Kitchin and William Walton Kitchin, and the great-great-great-great-great-uncle of Alvin Paul Kitchin.

Ancestors

Nathaniel’s father’s parents were John Macon (December 17, 1695 – March 31, 1752) and Ann Hunt (1697 – February 15, 1725), both of Virginia. Nathaniel’s paternal great-grandparents were Gideon Macon (c. 1648 – February 1701 or 1702) and Martha Woodward (1665–1723). Gideon and Martha Woodward Macon were also the great-grandparents of Martha Dandridge who married George Washington and became First Lady of the United States of America. Therefore, Nathaniel Macon was the second cousin of Martha Dandridge Washington.

Nathaniel's ancestors in three generations
Nathaniel Macon Father:Maj. Gideon Hunt Macon Paternal Grandfather:John Macon Paternal Great-grandfather:Col. Gideon Macon
Paternal Great-grandmother:Martha Woodward
Paternal Grandmother:Ann Hunt Paternal Great-grandfather:Capt. William Hunt
Paternal Great-grandmother:Tabitha Edloe
Mother:Priscilla Jones Maternal Grandfather:Col. Edward Jones Maternal Great-grandfather:Edward Jones
Maternal Great-grandmother:Deborah Exum
Maternal Grandmother:Abigail Shugan Maternal Great-grandfather:John Sugars
Maternal Great-grandmother:Elizabeth
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