Kevin Everett

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Kevin Everett bigraphy, stories - American football player

Kevin Everett : biography

February 5, 1982 –

Kevin Everett,(born February 5, 1982) is a former American football tight end who played for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Bills in the third round of the 2005 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Miami after transferring from Kilgore College.

On September 9, 2007, Everett sustained a fracture and dislocation of his cervical spine that his doctors characterized as "life-threatening" the day after the injury, and stated it is likely to leave him with permanent neurological impairment. However, on September 11, 2007, Everett showed significant movement in his arms and legs, which led doctors to speculate that he might eventually be able to walk again. Indeed, Everett walked in public for the first time at Ralph Wilson Stadium before the home finale against the New York Giants on December 23, 2007.

College career

Kilgore College

Kevin Everett attended Kilgore College in Kilgore, Texas for two years, where he was a two-time first-team All-Southwest Junior College football conference pick, ranked the second best junior college player in the nation. As a sophomore, he caught 18 passes for 310 yards and 2 touchdowns.

University of Miami

He subsequently transferred to the University of Miami. Everett left Miami as the 86th overall pick by the Buffalo Bills in the third round of the 2005 NFL Draft.

High school career

Everett attended Thomas Jefferson High School in Port Arthur, Texas, where he was a three-year letterman in football. As a senior, he won Class 5A All-State honors in 2000.

Professional career

In 2005, Everett became the second tight end the Buffalo Bills brought to the team in as many years, after Tim Euhus was drafted in 2004. Everett struggled with injuries almost from his first day of play with the Bills, having missed the 2005 season after suffering a torn knee ligament on the first day of 2005 minicamp. He was placed on the physically unable to perform list on August 10, 2005, and on injured reserve on November 30.

Everett returned to play in 2006, where he participated on special teams for most of the season. He made his first career start on September 10, 2006 at New England, with the Bills opening in a two-tight end set. On October 1 of that same year, Everett made his first career NFL reception, gaining one yard on a deflected pass.

Career ending injury and impact

On September 9, 2007, in week one of the 2007 NFL Season, while attempting to tackle Denver Broncos’ kickoff return man Domenik Hixon, Everett sustained a neck injury that resulted in his transport off the field by ambulance and emergency surgery at Millard Fillmore Gates Hospital. The injury was described as a cervical spine injury. Following the lengthy surgery, Everett’s agent, Brian Overstreet, expressed hope that the injured player would be able to walk, but also reported Everett’s movement as "sparse." Aside from his eyes, Everett had not shown any signs of movement on the field after sustaining the injury. It was announced that he would spend one or two days under sedation as doctors evaluate the severity of his injury.

In a televised September 10 press conference, Buffalo Bills team medical director Dr. John Marzo described Everett’s injury as a fracture and dislocation of the cervical spine, resulting in injury to the spinal cord. Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Andrew Cappuccino of Buffalo Spine Surgery, and member of the Buffalo Bills medical staff, was Everett’s attending surgeon, and described the injury to Everett’s spinal cord as a "scissoring" or "pinching" injury, caused by dislocation of the third and fourth cervical vertebrae.

Cappuccino repaired a fracture between the third and fourth vertebrae in a procedure that included a bone graft, the insertion of a plate and four screws in Everett’s spinal column, and the relief of pressure on the spinal cord. Cappuccino reported that, immediately after the injury, Everett could not feel anything below his shoulders, but the morning after surgery, he had some voluntary movement in his legs, and could feel pressure "down to his feet." However, Cappuccino gave the player a "statistically very small" chance of walking again.