Brian K. Vaughan

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Brian K. Vaughan bigraphy, stories - Writer

Brian K. Vaughan : biography

1976 –

Brian K. Vaughan (born 1976) is an American comic book and television writer, best known for the comic book series Y: The Last Man, Ex Machina, Runaways, Pride of Baghdad, and Saga.

Vaughan was a writer, story editor and producer of the television series Lost during seasons three through five. He was nominated for a Writers Guild of America Award for Best Dramatic Series at the February 2009 ceremony for his work on the fourth season. The writing staff was nominated for the award again at the February 2010 ceremony for their work on the fifth season.

Wired describes Vaughan’s comics work as "quirky, acclaimed stories that don’t pander and still pound pulses". His creator-owned comics work is also characterized by "finite, meticulous, years-long story arcs", on which Vaughan comments, "That’s storytelling, with a beginning, a middle, and an end. Something like Spider-Man, a book that never has a third act, that seems crazy."Rogers, Adam (April 24, 2007). . Wired

Career

Vaughan’s first credit was for Marvel Comics’ Tales From the Age of Apocalypse #2 (December 1996). He would eventually write for some of the highest-profile characters at Marvel, including X-Men, Spider-Man, and Captain America. He would also write Batman and Green Lantern for DC Comics, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight for Dark Horse Comics.

From 2002 to 2008, Vaughan, who came to prefer writing his own characters,Bendis, Brian Michael (July 25, 2006). Wizard World. wrote the creator-owned monthly series Y: The Last Man, a post-apocalyptic science fiction series about the only man to survive the apparent simultaneous death of every male mammal on Earth. The series was published in sixty issues by Vertigo and collected in a series of ten paperback volumes (and later a series of five hardcover "Deluxe" volumes). The series received Eisner Awards in 2005 and 2008, and numerous other nominations.. Hahn Library Comic Book Awards Almanac. Retrieved March 17, 2012.. San Diego Comic-Con International. Retrieved March 17, 2012. The film rights to the series were acquired by New Line Cinema. Vaughan wrote his own screenplay for the project, though it was reported in March 2012 that Matthew Federman and Stephen Scaia were in final negotiations to write their own version.

In 2006, Vaughan published the graphic novel Pride of Baghdad, which centers on a group of lions who escape from an Iraqi zoo after the start of the Iraq War. IGN named it the Best Original Graphic Novel of 2006, calling it a "modern classic", and lauding it for combining a tale of survival and family with a powerful analogy of war, and praising Vaughan for representing various viewpoints through the different lion characters.. IGN. Retrieved March 17, 2012.

From 2004 to 2010 Vaughan wrote another creator-owned series, Ex Machina, a political thriller that depicts the life of Mitchell Hundred, a former superhero known as the Great Machine who, in the wake of his heroism during the September 11, 2001 attacks, is elected Mayor of New York City. The story is set during Hundred’s term in office, and interwoven with flashbacks to his past as the Great Machine. Through this, the series explores both the political situations Hundred finds himself in, and the mysteries surrounding his superpowers. New Line Cinema purchased the film rights to the series in July 2005, and commissioned Vaughan to write one of the two commissioned scripts,. IGN. July 14, 2005 which he was reported to be working on in 2007. Following the conclusion of Ex Machina in 2010, Vaughan reiterated his previous statement that he would concentrate on creator-owned work, saying, "I realized when I turned in this final Ex Machina script that it would be the first time I wasn’t under some kind of deadline at Marvel or DC since 1996. That’s a huge chunk of my life to spend with those characters. I love them, and I still read Marvel and DC’s superhero books. I just think I’m better when I’m working on my own creations. When there are so many talented creators out there who are better at that stuff than me, I should leave those characters to them. I should do what I’m fortunate enough to be in the position to do, which is to create more new stuff."Schedeen, Jesse (August 12, 2010). . IGN.