Barry Windsor-Smith

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Barry Windsor-Smith bigraphy, stories - British graphic novelist

Barry Windsor-Smith : biography

25 May 1949 –

Barry Windsor-Smith (born Barry Smith in Forest Gate, London, on 25 May 1949), is a British comic book illustrator and painter whose best known work has been produced in the United States.

His international acclaim came as the original artist for Marvel Comics’ Conan the Barbarian from 1970 to 1973, where he rapidly evolved a sophisticated and intricate style, introducing elements from diverse artistic influences to graphic storytelling.

Awards

  • 1970 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Individual Story ("Lair of the Beast Men," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Conan the Barbarian #2) (nominated)
  • 1971 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Continuing Feature (Conan the Barbarian) (winner)
  • 1971 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Individual Story ("Devil Wings over Shadizar," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Conan the Barbarian #6 & "Tower of the Elephant," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Conan the Barbarian #4) (nominated)
  • 1972 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Individual Story Dramatic ("The Black Hound of Vengeance," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Conan the Barbarian #20) (nominated)
  • 1973 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Continuing Feature (Conan the Barbarian) (nominated)
  • 1973 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Individual Story Dramatic ("Song of Red Sonja," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Conan the Barbarian #24) (winner)
  • 1973 – British Fantasy Society Awards Best Comic (Conan the Barbarian) (winner)
  • 1974 – Academy of Comic Book Arts Awards Best Individual Story Dramatic ("Red Nails," by Roy Thomas & Barry Smith, from Savage Tales #1-3) (nominated)
  • 1974 – Shazam Award for Superior Achievement by an Individual (nominated)
  • 1974 – British Fantasy Society Awards Best Comic (Conan the Barbarian) (winner)
  • 1975 – Inkpot Award (winner)
  • 1975 – British Fantasy Society Awards Best Comic (The Savage Sword of Conan) (winner)
  • 1976 – British Fantasy Society Awards Best Comic (The Savage Sword of Conan) (winner)
  • 1977 – Eagle Awards Favourite Comicbook Artist (nominated)
  • 1985 – Haxtur Awards Best Long Story (Machine Man) (nominated)
  • 1985 – Haxtur Awards Best Drawing (Machine Man) (nominated)
  • 1990 – Gem Award for Outstanding Service and Product Best Comic under $3 (Deathmate Prologue) (nominated)
  • 1993 – U.K. Comic Art Awards Best New Feature (Archer & Armstrong), linkedin.com, 8 March 2010
  • 1997 – Comics’ Buyer’s Guide Favorite Colorist (nominated)
  • 1997 – Harvey Award Best New Series (Barry Windsor-Smith: Storyteller) (nominated)
  • 1998 – Comics’ Buyer’s Guide Favorite Colorist (nominated)
  • 2008 – Eisner Awards Hall of Fame (winner)

Career

Windsor Smith produced his first published work in 1967 and 1968 – single page "Powerhouse Pinups" of Marvel Comics characters for Terrific and Fantastic comics, titles published by Odhams Press that included licensed Marvel Comics reprints for the UK market. Following this, he flew to the U.S .in summer 1968 with fellow artist Steve Parkhouse for meetings at Marvel in New York. "I sent material first, and based solely upon a pleasant return note from Stan’s assistant Linda Fite, my pal and me were at Marvel’s doorstep in the blink of an eye."Cooke, Jon B. ; Comic Book Artist #2 May 1998 Largely due to his Jack Kirbyesque style, Marvel Comics Editor Roy Thomas gave him the job of drawing both the cover and story of X-Men #53 (cover-dated Feb. 1969), credited to Barry Smith as he was then known. He went on to draw Marvels’ Daredevil #50-52 (March–May 1969), a Western short story, "Half Breed" (probably the story "Outcast" eventually published in Western Gunfighters #4, Feb. 1971), and issue #12 of Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (May 1968), both scripted by Parkhouse. Windsor-Smith later called his early art "amateur and klutzy" and a "less than skillful" Kirby imitation, but Stan Lee liked it enough to give him more work However, with his visa having expired and without a work permit, Windsor-Smith was sent home by U.S. Immigration Authorities in December 1968.