Ayelet Waldman

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Ayelet Waldman bigraphy, stories - American writer

Ayelet Waldman : biography

December 11, 1964 –

Ayelet Waldman (born December 11, 1964) is a novelist and essayist who was formerly a lawyer. She is noted for her self-revelatory essays, and for her writing (both fiction and non-fiction) about the changing expectations of motherhood. She has written extensively about juggling the demands of children, partners, career and society, in particular about combining paid work with modern motherhood, and about the ensuing maternal ambivalence.

Waldman is the author of seven mystery novels in the series The Mommy-Track Mysteries and has published three novels of general interest, Daughter’s Keeper (2003), Love and Other Impossible Pursuits (2006) and Red Hook Road (2010), as well as a collection of personal essays entitled Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace (2009). A graduate of Wesleyan University (1986) and Harvard Law School (1991), Waldman spent three years working as a federal public defender and in all her fiction she has drawn extensively on her legal education and career as a lawyer.

Works

"Mommy-Track" mystery novels

  • Nursery Crimes (2000)
  • The Big Nap (2001)
  • Playdate With Death (2002)
  • Death Gets a Time-Out (2003)
  • Murder Plays House (2004)
  • The Cradle Robbers (2005)
  • Bye-Bye, Black Sheep (2006)

Other novels

  • Daughter’s Keeper (2003)
  • Love and Other Impossible Pursuits (2006)
  • Red Hook Road (Doubleday, 2010)

Nonfiction

  • Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities, and Occasional Moments of Grace (2009)

Essays

Radio essays

Nonfiction

Waldman, who has said "I think that I am an exhibitionist," has written many personal essays for online and print publications on a variety of topics, including aspects of motherhood, such as how women criticize each other’s mothering (that is, the "mommy wars"),, New York Times, March 12, 2010]. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) combining paid work with motherhood, and how the upbringing of those raised in a postfeminist era clashed with the reality of having to make professional sacrifices. Her essays have also explored the sexuality of mothersWaldman, Ayelet, , New York Times, March 27, 2005. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) and of young people,, NPR, March 20, 2009. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) homework,, Salon.com, October 22, 2005. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) extended family life,, Mail Online, June 18, 2009. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) body image,, Salon.com, December 12, 2005. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) aging,, Harper’s Bazaar. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) literary hoaxes,, Salon.com, January 11, 2006. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) and Jewish life., Tablet, September 29, 2004. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.) Although most of her nonfiction is personal, she has also written on aspects of the criminal justice system., Salon.com, November 14, 2005. (Retrieved on August 25, 2010.)

These essays have been published in a former regular column in Salon.com and in newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, The Guardian, The San Francisco Chronicle , Elle Magazine, Vogue, Allure, Cookie, Child, Parenting, Real Simple, and Health. Waldman has also recorded radio essays on All Things Considered, The California Report, and other radio programs.