Anna Wintour

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Anna Wintour : biography

3 November 1949 –

That year was generally difficult, as the economy worsened. After ruffling feathers at Milan’s shows in February, the April issue’s cover image of LeBron James and Gisele Bündchen brought criticism for its evocation of racial stereotypes. The next month a lavish Karl Lagerfeld gown she wore to the Met’s Costume Institute Gala was called "the worst fashion faux pas of 2008." In the fall Vogue Living was suspended indefinitely, and Men’s Vogue cut back to two issues a year as an outsert or supplement to the women’s magazine. At the end of the year, December’s cover highlighted a disparaging comment Jennifer Aniston made about Angelina Jolie, to the former’s displeasure. It seemed she had lost her touch. In 2008, rumours arose that she would retire, and be replaced by French Vogue editor Carine Roitfeld. An editor at Russian GQ reportedly introduced Russian Vogue editor Aliona Doletskaya as the next editor of American Vogue. Condé Nast responded by taking out a full-page ad in The New York Times defending her record. In that same publication, Cathy Horyn later wrote that while Wintour hadn’t lost her touch, the magazine had become "stale and predictable", as a reader had recently complained. "To read Vogue in recent years is to wonder about the peculiar fascination for the ‘villa in Tuscany’ story", Horyn added. The magazine also dealt awkwardly with the recession, she commented.

In 2009, Wintour began making more media appearances. On a 60 Minutes profile, she said she would not retire. "To me this is a really interesting time to be in this position and I think it would be in a way irresponsible not to put my best foot forward and lead us into a different time".Safer, 4. In September, The September Issue, a documentary film by The War Room producer R.J. Cutler about the production of the September 2007 issue, was released. It focused on the sometimes-difficult relationship between Wintour and creative director Grace Coddington. She appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman to promote it, defending the relevance of fashion in a tough economy. The American Society of Magazine Editors elected her to its Hall of Fame in 2010.

In 2013 Condé Nast announced she would be taking on the position of artistic director for the company’s magazines while remaining at Vogue. She assumed some of the responsibilities of Si Newhouse, the company’s longtime editorial director, who, in his mid-80s at the time, had begun moving from his role at Condé Nast to join the rest of his family in managing Advance Publications, its parent company. A company spokesman told The New York Times the position was created to keep Wintour. She described it as "an extension of what I am doing, but on a broader scale."

Fashion industry power broker

Through the years she has come to be regarded as one of the most powerful people in fashion, setting trends and anointing new designers. Industry publicists often hear "Do you want me to go to Anna with this?" when they have differences with her subordinates. The Guardian has called her the "unofficial mayoress" of New York City.Pilkington, Ed; 5 December 2006; ; The Guardian. Retrieved 6 December 2006. She has encouraged fashion houses such as Christian Dior to hire younger, fresher designers such as John Galliano.

Her influence extends outside fashion. She persuaded Donald Trump to let Marc Jacobs use a ballroom at the Plaza Hotel for a show when Jacobs and his partner were short of cash. More recently, she persuaded Brooks Brothers to hire the relatively unknown Thom Browne.Horyn, "Citizen Anna", 1. A protégée at Vogue, Plum Sykes, became a successful novelist, drawing her settings from New York’s fashionable élite.

Her salary was reported to be $2 million a year in 2005.26 September 2005; ; New York. Retrieved 3 March 2007. In addition, she receives several perks, such as a chauffeured Mercedes S-Class (both in New York and abroad), a $200,000 shopping allowance, and the Coco Chanel Suite at the Hotel Ritz Paris while attending European fashion shows. Condé Nast president S. I. Newhouse also had the company make her an interest-free $1.6 million loan to purchase her townhouse in Greenwich Village.Oppenheimer, 29.