Ann Coulter

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Ann Coulter : biography

December 8, 1961 –

Coulter wrote in another column that she had reviewed the civil rights lawsuits against certain airlines to determine which of them had subjected Arabs to the most "egregious discrimination" so that she could fly only that airline. She also said that the airline should be bragging instead of denying any of the charges of discrimination brought against them.Coulter, Ann. "" Jewish World Review April 29, 2004. Retrieved on July 11, 2006. In an interview with The Guardian she quipped, "I think airlines ought to start advertising: ‘We have the most civil rights lawsuits brought against us by Arabs.’" When the interviewer replied by asking what Muslims would do for travel, she responded, "They could use flying carpets."Freedland, Jonathan "". The Guardian, May 17, 2003. Retrieved on July 10, 2006.

One comment that drew criticism from the blogosphere, as well as fellow conservatives,Gossett, Sherrie. "" Cybercast News Service February 13, 2006. Retrieved on July 11, 2006. was made during a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference in February 2006, where she said, referring to the prospect of a nuclear-equipped Iran, "What if they start having one of these bipolar episodes with nuclear weapons? I think our motto should be, post-9-11: Raghead talks tough, raghead faces consequences."Kurtz, Howard. "" Washington Post February 14, 2006. Retrieved on July 11, 2006. Coulter had previously written a nearly identical passage in her syndicated column: "…I believe our motto should be, after 9/11: Jihad monkey talks tough; jihad monkey takes the consequences. Sorry, I realize that’s offensive. How about ‘camel jockey’? What? Now what’d I say? Boy, you tent merchants sure are touchy. Grow up, would you?"Coulter, Ann. . February 15, 2006

In October 2007, Coulter made further controversial remarks regarding Arabs—in this case Iraqis—when she stated in an interview with The New York Observer:

We’ve killed about 20,000 of them, of terrorists, of militants, of Al Qaeda members, and they’ve gotten a little over 3,000 of ours. That is where the war is being fought, in Iraq. That is where we are fighting Al Qaeda. Sorry we have to use your country, Iraqis, but you let Saddam come to power, and we are going to instill democracy in your country.

In a May 2007 article looking back at the life of recently deceased evangelical Reverend Jerry Falwell, Coulter commented on his (later retracted) statement after the 9/11 attacks that "the pagans, and the abortionists, and the feminists, and the gays and the lesbians who are actively trying to make that an alternative lifestyle, the ACLU, People For the American Way, all of them who have tried to secularize America … helped this happen." In her article, Coulter stated that she disagreed with Falwell’s statement, "because Falwell neglected to specifically include Teddy Kennedy and ‘the Reverend’ Barry Lynn."Coulter, Ann. "" AnnCoulter.com May 16, 2007. Retrieved on May 23, 2007.

In October 2007, Coulter participated in David Horowitz’ "Islamo-Fascism Awareness Week," remarking in a speech at the University of Southern California, "The fact of Islamo-Fascism is indisputable. I find it tedious to detail the savagery of the enemy … I want to kill them. Why don’t Democrats?"

In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings Coulter told Hannity host Sean Hannity that the wife of bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev should be jailed for wearing a hijab. Coulter continued by saying "Assimilating immigrants into our culture isn’t really working. They’re assimilating us into their culture."

Ionizing radiation as "cancer vaccine"

On March 16, 2011, discussing the Fukushima I nuclear accidents, Coulter, citing research into radiation hormesis, wrote that there was "burgeoning evidence that excess radiation operates as a sort of cancer vaccine." Her comments were criticized by figures across the political spectrum, from Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly (who told Coulter, "You have to be responsible …. in something like this, you gotta get the folks out of there, and you have to report worst-case scenarios") to MSNBC’s Ed Schulz (who stated that "You would laugh at her if she wasn’t making light of a terrible tragedy.")