Ann Coulter

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Ann Coulter : biography

December 8, 1961 –

Coulter wrote:

Jones claimed not to have been offered any help with a book deal of her own or any other additional financial help after the lawsuit. 

2008 presidential election

As the 2008 presidential campaign was getting under way, Coulter drew criticism for statements she made at the 2007 Conservative Political Action Conference about presidential candidate John Edwards:

The comment was in reference to Grey’s Anatomy star Isaiah Washington’s use of the epithet and his subsequent mandatory "psychological assessment" imposed by ABC executives. It was widely interpreted as meaning that Coulter had called Edwards a "faggot," but Coulter argued that she didn’t actually do so, while simultaneously indicating she would not have been wrong to say it. Edwards responded on his web site by characterizing Coulter’s words as "un-American and indefensible," and asking readers to help him "raise $100,000 in ‘Coulter Cash’ this week to keep this campaign charging ahead and fight back against the politics of bigotry." He also called her a "she-devil," adding, "I should not have name-called. But the truth is—forget the names—people like Ann Coulter, they engage in hateful language." Coulter’s words also drew condemnation from many prominent Republicans and Democrats, as well as groups such as the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD). Three advertisers (Verizon, Sallie Mae and Netbank) also pulled their advertisements from Coulter’s web site, and several newspapers dropped her column. Coulter responded in an e-mail to the New York Times, "C’mon, it was a joke. I would never insult gays by suggesting that they are like John Edwards. That would be mean." On March 5, 2007, she appeared on Hannity and Colmes and said, "Faggot isn’t offensive to gays; it has nothing to do with gays. It’s a schoolyard taunt meaning ‘wuss.’" Gay rights advocates were not convinced. "Ann Coulter’s use of this anti-gay slur is vile and unacceptable," said Neil G. Giuliano, president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, "and the applause from her audience is an important reminder that Coulter’s ugly brand of bigotry is at the root of the discriminatory policies being promoted at this gathering." A spokesman for Sen. John McCain, a Republican presidential candidate, called Coulter’s comments "wildly inappropriate."

As the campaign waged on, she continued to insert her commentary regarding the candidates, both Democrats and Republicans. In a June 2007 interview, Coulter named Duncan Hunter as her choice for the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination, highlighting his views on immigration and specifically his anti-abortion credentials, saying "[t]his is a winning issue for us, protecting little babies."Good Morning America, ABC: June 25, 2007. On January 16, 2008, Coulter began endorsing Governor Mitt Romney as her choice for the 2008 Republican nomination, saying he is "manifestly the best candidate" (contrasting Romney with Republican candidates John McCain, Mike Huckabee, and Rudy Giuliani). By contrast, Coulter was critical of eventual Republican nominee John McCain. On the January 31, 2008 broadcast of Hannity and Colmes, Coulter claimed that if McCain won the Republican nomination for president, she would support and campaign for Hillary Clinton, stating, "[Clinton] is more conservative than McCain."

Dreams from My Father Mein Kampf

2010 Canadian university tour

In March 2010, Coulter announced that she would be embarking on a speaking tour of three Canadian universities, The University of Western Ontario, the University of Ottawa and the University of Calgary. The tour was organized by the International Free Press Society.

On the eve of Coulter’s first speech at the University of Western Ontario, an e-mail to Coulter from Francois Houle, provost of the University of Ottawa, was leaked to the media. The e-mail warned that "promoting hatred against any identifiable group would not only be considered inappropriate, but could in fact lead to criminal charges." Coulter released a public statement pointing out that by sending her the e-mail, Houle was promoting hatred against conservatives. During her speech at the University of Western Ontario she told a Muslim student to "take a camel," in response to the student’s question about previous comments by Coulter that Muslims should not be allowed on airplanes.